Act Now

Coal ash pollution

Yet again, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is out to please his industry allies at the expense of public health and the environment. His latest assault is on the Clean Water Act’s coverage of pollution that flows into lakes, rivers, and bays through groundwater. Tell EPA not to weaken the Clean Water Act today!

Senator Markey (D-MA) and the Wheel of Giveaways. Screenshot from CSPAN

Big polluters and their friends in Congress are pushing an extreme agenda to rollback vital laws, regulations, and funding that protect clean water, reduce air pollution, and fight climate change.

Oil and Gas Money is Choking our Democracy

The oil and gas industry, aided by the erosion of campaign finance laws and nearly boundless lobbying budgets, asserts enormous influence over legislative processes in real time while also enjoying legacy influence in regulatory frame- works. The results can be devastating to the health of the environment and the public.

 Capitol Dome with flag

Corporate polluters and their friends in Congress are pushing an extreme agenda to roll back vital laws, regulations, and funding that protect clean water, reduce air pollution, and fight climate change. Please urge your representatives in Congress to stand up for commonsense protections, and to reject budget cuts that undermine vital safeguards.

A rally for offshore wind in May 2017 in front of Baltimore's City Hall.

Tell the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management to approve Maryland's offshore wind farms without unnecessary and harmful restrictions that could make the projects impossible to complete.

Last year, Clean Water Action, along with our partners in Fair Farms and the MD Keep Antibiotics Working coalition, passed legislation that phases out the use of antibiotics to treat healthy animals. Nationally, some of the largest chicken growers have already voluntarily committed to phasing out this overuse of antibiotics (and are in the process of implementation).

Septic tank lid. photo: flickr.com/mmwm (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Right now, the State House Natural Resources Committee is holding hearings on two bills, HB 5752 and HB 5753, that would create a statewide sanitary code for Michigan that requires regular inspections of all septic systems.

Back to the 80s? photo: istock.com

The state legislature is moving bills (SB 1088/HB 2154) that would roll back protections for shallow oil and gas drilling to 1984 standards.