Waste

Clean Water is  taking-on single use products. From shopping bags, to food and beverage packaging, to plastic water bottles, our goal is to minimize the use of single use products.  We engage businesses, local governments, and individual consumers in rethinking the disposable lifestyle.

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100 for Clean Water

Be a difference maker when it comes to the environment, our health, our future.

Become 1 of the 100 for Clean Water.

Recent Actions

Take the Pledge to Reduce Single-Use today!

Pledge to reduce your reliance on single-use disposable products and packaging.

Press Releases

Make “House Call” on South Carolina Company Spending the Most To Overturn Environmental Protections, Persist with Plastic Pollution

January 31, 2013

Community leaders and environmental advocates marked the beginning of a 30- day countdown to implementation of Austin’s Single-Use Bag Ordinance by announcing a “Bag to the Future” concert and party, scheduled for February 28th, the day before the new law goes into effect.

Waste Blog Posts

October 18, 2017

One of the toughest challenges working in the environmental movement is it can be difficult to point to a specific and measurable impact, in the same way that polluters can kid themselves they’re doing well, with their up-ticking sales and profit graphs.

August 25, 2017

Our $400,000 Ocean Protection Council-funded project has officially launched on the island of Alameda in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Clean Water Fund attended the 33rd Annual Alameda Art and Wine Faire on July 29, 2017 to unveil a groundbreaking project called “ReThink Disposable: Unpackaging Alameda, ” to create a model “unpackaged” community by engaging 100 food businesses on the island to become ReThink Disposable certified.

Waste_Plastic_National_Pile. Photo: Mikadun / Shutterstock
August 4, 2017

The world is awash in plastic trash. We've produced more than 9 billion tons of plastic since the middle of the 20th century and most of it lingers in landfills and recycling piles, in our oceans, on our beaches, and in our bodies. It's not going anywhere anytime soon.  It's our toxic legacy.