maryland

Over 30 Baltimore residents outside of City Hall wearing red in support of the Oil Trains Ordinance

Baltimore residents rally against #crudeoiltrains - but no progress on safety bill

November 3, 2016

"I don't want to be sitting here when something happens and we didn't do everything we could possibly do to prevent it."

Oil Train photo by Jennifer Kunze

Oil Train Victories Across the Country

August 25, 2016

In Baltimore, Clean Water Action has been working for two years to prevent further oil train traffic from passing through our city and to make sure the City government, emergency services, and the public know all of the risks and health impacts that oil train shipments can cause. Our campaign is only a part of a nation-wide effort to stop oil trains, and the past few weeks have seen a lot of important victories and news across the country.

Maryland Gas Basins. Source USGS

Ban Fracking in Frederick County

August 17, 2016

When Marylanders consider the risk of fracking in our state, we usually think of the Western Maryland counties – Washington, Alleghany, and Garret – that lie above the Marcellus Gas Basin.  But smaller gas basins cross all parts of our state, including two in Frederick County.  The Culpeper Basin stretches north from Virginia beneath Adamstown and Ballenger Creek to southern Frederick City; the Gettysburg Basin comes south from Pennsylvania beneath the Monocacy River touching Emmitsburg, Thurmont, and the northern edge of Frederick City including parts of Fort Detrick.  All together, 19% of Frederick County has frackable gas beneath it – and that puts our farms, rivers, and drinking water at risk.

Frederick County_Stormwater_Maryland_Photo by Jennifer Kunze

Funding for polluted runoff protections falls short in Frederick

August 17, 2016

“Generally, they’re getting worse.” That was the verdict on Frederick County’s local streams at last night’s public hearing on the County’s Financial Assurance Plan, a document that should outline how the County government will pay for stormwater restoration projects mandated by the Chesapeake Bay Plan.

Fredrick County Maryland photo for Brent Bolin blog post

Maryland residents drive new effort to protect drinking water, local streams in Frederick

August 16, 2016

Local policy push aims to clean up Monocacy and Potomac rivers.

SGACC Celebration in Maryland

Celebrating a Clean Water Victory in Maryland!

August 12, 2016

Last month, Charles County Commissioners voted 3/2 in favor of a new Comprehensive Growth Plan that will preserve Charles County’s precious natural resources and high quality of life for generations to come.  

Sewage Overflow in Baltimore. Photo by Jennifer Kunze

6 Million Gallons of Sewage in Baltimore's Waterways

August 8, 2016

When Baltimore City’s sewer system was first installed in 1909, it was considered cutting edge technology. Now, after over a century of neglect, it is undersized and outdated, and has led to raw sewage flowing into the city’s waterways and flooding residents’ basements.

Green infrastructure projects like this rain garden in East Baltimore hold rainwater in place until it can soak into the ground and reduce the total volume of water entering the storm drain system. Photo by Jennifer Kunze.

Reducing Stormwater Runoff in the Chesapeake Bay

August 8, 2016

Stormwater runoff is one of the leading contributors to pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. After big storms, the water carries whatever is on the ground and in the streets into our waterways. Impervious surfaces, such as the roads and pavement that cover densely populated areas, don’t allow rain to seep into the ground, causing more polluted stormwater to enter the Bay.

Debris in Maryland Photo by Jennifer Kunze

Flash flood shows need for better stormwater restoration plans

August 3, 2016

On Saturday, July 30th, a flash flood devastated Ellicott City. Approximately six inches of rain fell in two hours, which carried away over 100 vehicles and caused millions of dollars of damage to the City’s roads, sidewalks, and buildings. Not only was there severe destruction of infrastructure, but the storm also killed two people who were swept away by the water.

Sinkhole in Baltimore. Photo by Abigail Pearse

Last week’s downtown sinkhole shows need for infrastructure investment

July 15, 2016

On Monday, July 4th, a sinkhole formed on West Mulberry Street in Baltimore City. Located between Greene and Paca Streets, this sinkhole will block traffic on Mulberry street for weeks and has already caused transportation officials to close a ramp off of U.S. Route 40 that led to downtown Baltimore. Not only is this sinkhole an inconvenience for traffic, but it is also unsafe. An inspector from the Department of Public Works (DPW) was injured as he examined the sinkhole when the ground collapsed under him, which widened the sinkhole.