Waste

Clean Water is  taking-on single use products. From shopping bags, to food and beverage packaging, to plastic water bottles, our goal is to minimize the use of single use products.  We engage businesses, local governments, and individual consumers in rethinking the disposable lifestyle.

Waste_garbage_can_overflowing_ReThink Disposable

ReThink Disposable - Governments

Preventing packaging at the source protects the environment and public health, reduces cleanup costs, and supports municipal Climate Action, Zero Waste, and Clean Water Program goals.

Recent Actions

Take the Pledge to Reduce Single-Use today!

Pledge to reduce your reliance on single-use disposable products and packaging.

Let's Phase Out Single-Use Plastic Bags in Rhode Island!

Let your State Representative and Senator know that you want them to support statewide legislative efforts to phase out single-use plastic bags once and for all!

Press Releases

June 21, 2018

“Just as recycling became a paradigm shift 30 years ago, reusables can become the new normal.”

December 21, 2017

Clean Water Action is looking forward to having NJ’s next governor put Catherine McCabe in the driver’s seat as the new NJDEP Commissioner. She is a person who has made a career of being a science-based environmentalist.

Waste Blog Posts

NJ_ReThink Disposable_Maura and Allie_New Jersey_Montclair_Photo Courtesy DRURY THORP
June 12, 2018

The ReThink Disposable team has been hard at work encouraging businesses to reduce their use of plastic straws. One of our greatest lessons learned these past few months is that every voice counts. This Spring, not only did we speak with business owners, we partnered up with local fifth grade students eager to spread the word to help save marine life.

Shannon Rose Cocktail_ReThinkDisposable_NJ_Photo by Doherty Enterprises
June 4, 2018

Governments and municipalities all over the world are proposing bans on single-use plastic straws, from the U.K. to Monmouth Beach, New Jersey! Here in New Jersey, ReThink Disposable is excited to highlight restaurants who have changed their own policies on serving plastic straws in order to address the issues of plastic pollution in our oceans.

May 24, 2018

The number of plastic disposables produced has risen from 2 million tons to 380 million tons between 1950 and 2015, half of which has been produced within the last 13 years (The Ocean Conservancy). However, making small changes in our daily lifestyles can reduce our use of plastics.