Waste

Clean Water is  taking-on single use products. From shopping bags, to food and beverage packaging, to plastic water bottles, our goal is to minimize the use of single use products.  We engage businesses, local governments, and individual consumers in rethinking the disposable lifestyle.

Thumbs up! Photo credt: william87 / iStock

Take the Pledge to Reduce Single-Use!

There are so many things you can do to reduce your disposables footprint. These are our Top 10 actions for how to ReThink Disposable. Make a pledge below to continue doing the ones you already do, and choose the new actions you are willing to commit to.

Recent Actions

Let's Eliminate Single-Use Bags in Philly!

Did you know the Philadelphia Water Department found that plastic bags comprise 17% of the total debris recovered by their skimming operations?

Take the Pledge to Reduce Single-Use today!

Pledge to reduce your reliance on single-use disposable products and packaging.

Let's Phase Out Single-Use Plastic Bags in Rhode Island!

Let your State Representative and Senator know that you want them to support statewide legislative efforts to phase out single-use plastic bags once and for all!

Take Action: Ban Plastic Bags in NJ

Ask the NJ State Legislature for a ban on single-use plastics.

 

Press Releases

March 8, 2019

On March 8th, an unlikely alliance of Republican and Democratic legislators, residents from across Maryland, and environmental advocates gathered to demand the end of public subsidies for

January 24, 2019

BERKELEY, Calif. – The Berkeley, CA City Council has taken an important step to drastically reduce the amount of disposable foodware coming out of the doors of the city’s restaurants.

September 21, 2018

On September 21st, a group of Baltimore residents, local elected officials, and environmental advocates rallied in a str

Waste Blog Posts

April 8, 2019

People all across Maryland - especially in Baltimore, Frederick, and Montgomery County where communities have fought or are fighting against trash incinerators in their neighborhoods - have been working to make sure that any increase in the renewable portfolio standard not increase subsidies for trash incineration. Today, on the last day of the legislative session, the current version of the Clean Energy Jobs Act maintains burning trash as a tier 1 renewable energy source, keeping it eligible for the maximum amount of subsidy available.

discarded coffee cups in trash
April 3, 2019

The United States contains 5% of the world’s population, yet consumes about a quarter of the planet’s resources. Much of this consumption stems from our “throw away” lifestyle, whereby many products are used once and then thrown away. This started in the 1950s, when the plastics and chemical industries sold the American public on the convenience of single-use disposable items. In 2011, the average American produced 4.4 pounds of household garbage per day, twice as much as in 1960.

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March 27, 2019

The great state of New Jersey has a chance to make a huge splash in the fight to save our oceans from plastic pollution.