Waste

Clean Water is  taking-on single use products. From shopping bags, to food and beverage packaging, to plastic water bottles, our goal is to minimize the use of single use products.  We engage businesses, local governments, and individual consumers in rethinking the disposable lifestyle.

MA_boston Skyline from the North (needpix.com)

Welcome to Clean Water Action, Massachusetts!

Everything is interconnected: clean water, good health, a stable climate, a healthy environment, economic well-being, a robust democracy, and justice for all—especially the most vulnerable among us. That’s why Clean Water Action aims to makes these basic rights and values central to all of our work.

Recent Actions

Take the Pledge to Reduce Single-Use today!

Pledge to reduce your reliance on single-use disposable products and packaging.

Tell MassDEP you want a Zero Waste Master Plan!

Massachusetts is at a crossroads: We bury, burn, or export 5.6 million tons of trash each year which threatens the health of our communities, destroys valuable resources and wastes a lot of taxpayer money.

Take Action: Ban Plastic Bags in NJ

Ask the NJ State Legislature for a ban on single-use plastics.

 

Let's Eliminate Single-Use Bags in Philly!

Did you know the Philadelphia Water Department found that plastic bags comprise 17% of the total debris recovered by their skimming operations?

Waste Blog Posts

November 27, 2019

"Raw sewage is bad for human health - this is universal." -Chris Heaney, Associate Professor for Environmental Health and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University

 

November 19, 2019

Winter is here and the season for holiday entertaining is fast approaching. While hosting any kind of gathering, it is easy to focus on convenience rather than on how much waste you are creating. Yet, every bit of trash generated will end up polluting the environment down the line. Waste and plastic pollution has become a global environmental crisis, threatening our waterways and oceans, wildlife, public health, and even our climate. By the year 2050, there will be more plastic in the ocean, by weight, than fish. And the problem doesn’t stop there.

October 23, 2019
On October 15th, I visited the Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant on a tour with Baltimore Heritage. Though the plant was originally constructed in 1940, the iteration that exists today was finished in 1985 and treats wastewater: 90% from households, and 10% from industrial sources. This wastewater comes from South and West Baltimore city, along with Baltimore, Anne Arundel and Howard Counties.