Protecting Pennsylvania Communities from the Hazards of Lead

Eighteen Pennsylvania cities tested higher than Flint, MI for elevated blood lead levels and a growing chorus of evidence indicates a possible broader statewide lead problem. Lead is a highly poisonous metal and can affect almost every organ in the body and the nervous system. Clean Water Action is working to protect public health by reducing lead exposure through drinking water and in paint, dust, and soil, and by educating Pennsylvanians on how to identify and reduce lead in their communities.

Vacuuming a carpet / photo: flickr.com//wyldkyss CC

Lead Hazard Awareness Project: Housecleaning for Lead Safety

If you live in an old city house, you likely have lead in your paint and lead in your soil.  Dust from both paint and soil contributes to house dus

Garden / photo: flickr.com/mugsy CC

Lead Hazard Awareness Project: Fighting Lead-contaminated Soil and Dust

Philadelphia’s smelters are shut down, and cars no longer run on leaded gasoline. But the lead they released still clings to the soil surface, along with flakes of exterior lead paint. The result: lead is in the dirt that sticks to shoes and hands after work or play in bare soil.

Manchester neighborhood, Pittsburgh photo: flickr.com/jmd41280 (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Request a Free Lead Seminar in Your Neighborhood

Is your family at risk from lead? Fill out the form below to arrange a free presentation for you, your family and your neighbors.

Pennsylvania Capitol, photo: Clean Water Action

Don't let elected officials weaken protections for our water and health!

In 2018 we successfully defeated a package of bills crafted under the guise of “regulatory reform”.