The Clean Water Blog

We All Live Downstream

CT_Rain Garden_Photo Credit Clean Water Action.jpg
August 21, 2019

One of the best things about working for Clean Water Action is the opportunity to meet and work with so many wonderful people on a variety of issues that protect our water and reduce pollution. A highlight this year was working with students and teachers at the Connecticut River Academy to design and build a rain garden that will reduce stormwater runoff into the Connecticut River.

Farmington River. Credit Jon-Lewis, Flickr--Creative Commons
August 20, 2019

It’s unfortunate that it took a tragic spill of nearly 40,000 gallons of firefighting foam into the Farmington River for PFAS contamination to finally get some attention in Connecticut. And we’re finally getting some action -- U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal is leading efforts in Washington to assure that firefighting foam containing PFAS chemicals is no longer required by the Department of Defense (DOD). We thank the Senator for his efforts and are proud to join with him to urge strong federal action. 

Clean  Energy for All - watch the video
August 19, 2019

“The solutions don’t need to be removed from the community: given the right resources, given the right support, we can really build an economy based on renewable energy,” -- Maria Belén Power, GreenRoots

forest along water
August 14, 2019

On Tuesday, August 20th, County Executive Pittman is holding a town hall at South River High School (201 Central Ave E, Edgewater, MD 21037) at 6:30 PM to present his proposed update to Anne Arundel County's Forest Conservation laws. 

Forests throughout Maryland are disappearing, replaced by development. When trends are analyzed, it becomes apparent that Maryland's state minimum forest conservation practices are not doing a good job at protecting our contiguous and heavily forested parcels. It is in these heavily forested parcels that the state is losing hundreds of acres a year.

August 12, 2019

In the next few decades, how and where Frederick County grows will have enormous impacts on improvement or decline in air and water quality, how much County residents contribute to climate change, and how the County adapts to the changing climate around us.  Frederick County is in the process of writing the Livable Frederick Master Plan, a document to envision what the County will look like in 2040 and the steps we should take to get there. Download the document and read more about that process here.

Rooftop solar panel. photo: istock.com
August 12, 2019

Clean energy belongs to us all, but unequal access to resources like solar, a key part of our renewable energy future, show us we have a long way to go. Clean Water Action is fighting to ensure all communities have access to renewable power and the green economy.

MA_nanotechnology_Source Adobe Spark
August 12, 2019

Clean Water is pressing the state of Massachusetts to develop systems to oversee the emerging nano-technology industry. 

Baltimore City Councilman Bill Henry, residents, and advocates in front of City Hall after the Plastic Bag Reduction Bill public hearing.
August 12, 2019

On Tuesday, August 6, the Baltimore City Council's Judiciary Committee held its first public hearing on the Plastic Bag Reduction Bill. This important legislation bans plastic bags in stores in Baltimore, with exceptions for bags used for products like fresh meats, unpackaged fruits, or ice, and locations like farmers' markets and pharmacies. It also puts a 5-cent fee on paper bags - part of which will help the store meet the extra cost of buying and storing paper bags, and part of which can help the city distribute free reusable bags.

srl pipeline construction
August 9, 2019

Today the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) unveiled its latest attack on the Clean Water Act and protections for our water and communities. Don’t worry if you’ve lost count -- this is the third or fourth this year -- and more are coming

What did EPA propose?

the ReThink Disposable Team at a celebration of the Alameda project
August 9, 2019

We are proud that, with the Ocean Protection Council, we have successfully wrapped a two-year project to unpackage the city of Alameda. For two years, our team pounded the pavement in Alameda, talking to business owners about our project, meeting with local government, and recruiting student volunteers and community ambassadors for the project. We invested in understanding the rhythms of day-to-day life in this vibrant, interconnected city.