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Get Diesel Out of Oil and Gas Drilling - Take Action

frack operations - smaller.JPGOn February 11, 2014 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published final Permitting Guidance for Hydraulic Fracturing Oil and Gas Activities Using Diesel.  Clean Water Action has worked to ensure that the processes are in place to implement the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) where diesel is used in hydraulic fracturing oil and gas drilling, and this was a positive step.  We’re now urging EPA to move forward with a formal rulemaking process to make sure that proper permits can be issued in all states under SDWA’s Underground Injection Control Program, which is designed to protect underground sources of drinking water.

Click here to send a message to EPA today!

Tackling Toxic Diesel in Oil and Gas Drilling

This February, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) took long-overdue steps to regulate toxic diesel used in hydraulic fracturing (fracking), issuing its first Permitting Guidance to protect underground drinking water sources from the practice. EPA’s action follows a year-long campaign by Clean Water Action and allies that featured more than 10,000 comments to the agency from Clean Water Action members.

In a special deal for the energy industry, Congress exempted hydraulic fracturing (fracking) from Safe Drinking Water Act protections in 2005. But even then lawmakers recognized that diesel used in fracking poses special risks to drinking water sources and made that one aspect of fracking subject to the law’s Underground Injection Control Program (UIC).

Putting Drinking Water First: Clean Water Action Applauds Obama Administration Proposal to Restore Clean Water Act Protections

Protecting Streams and WetlandsWashington – The Obama Administration put drinking water first today, taking a critical step toward restoring Clean Water Act protection for the sources of drinking water for one in three Americans. Clean Water Action applauds this vital proposal, which comes after more than 12 years of pressure by the organization and its members, urging the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps of Engineers (the Corps) to close gaps in protection for nearly 20 million acres of wetlands and half of the nation’s small streams.

Published On: 
03/25/2014 - 11:06

The National Newsletter | Spring 2014

clean water currents
spring 2014 edition

One Step Closer to Restoring Protections for All Water

New policies proposed in March 2014 by the Obama Administration would finally restore protection for all streams and wetlands. The long-anticipated move follows more than a decade of campaigning by Clean Water Action and allies, and seeing this restoration of Clean Water Act protections through to completion is a priority.

When Congress first passed the 1972 Clean Water Act, it was with the understanding that all streams and wetlands can impact the biological, physical and chemical integrity of larger downstream waters. But starting in 2001, polluter-friendly court decisions and agency actions that followed stripped away longstanding Clean Water Act protections, leaving critical resources vulnerable to pollution and destruction. Read more

$1 Million for Clean Water!$1 million for Clean Water. That’s how much has been raised so far by hundreds of thousands of supporters using the simple online-shopping app from We-Care.com. Here, Clean Water Action’s CEO, Bob Wendelgass  receives the “big check” from We-Care.com’s Dylan Nord, Gina Navani and Bryan Cockerham. Join us, and make your online purchases count for clean water.

Tell EPA: Protect All Streams and Wetlands!

Submit Comments to EPA Today!The health of our nation’s rivers, lakes, and bays depends on the network of small streams and wetlands that flow into them. But many of these small streams and wetlands are now denied protection under the Clean Water Act and these vital water resources are vulnerable to pollution or destruction. Join your neighbors and thousands of Clean Water Action members today and tell the Administration to take action to protect all of our nation’s water.

Mind the Store

Mind the StoreAs the campaign to reform U.S. chemical safety policies continues on its multi-year path to update our laws in Congress, Clean Water Action has joined a related effort seeking leadership in safer chemicals and safer products from top retailers across the nation – the Mind the Store campaign.

Policy on Investing in Fossil Fuels

Because of the impacts of fossil fuels on the earth’s climate and the damage they cause to our air and water, it is the policy of Clean Water Action and Clean Water Fund to avoid investing any of their funds in companies that mine, produce, refine or burn fossil fuels.

Currently, there are limited investment choices that are completely fossil-fuel free.  In 2013, Clean Water Action and Clean Water Fund began moving their investments to socially responsible funds which are either fossil-fuel free or include minimal investments in fossil fuels in their portfolio.

Testimony on the West Virginia Chemical Spill and Drinking Water

Testimony for the Record (Download the PDF)

EPA’s Coal Ash Rule Must Ensure Public Safety and Establish Federal Enforcement Authority

March 4, 2014
The Honorable Gina McCarthy
Administrator
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20460

Re: EPA’s Coal Ash Rule Must Ensure Public Safety and Establish Federal Enforcement Authority

Dear Administrator McCarthy:

Protect Our Water From Coal Ash - Take Action!

Coal Ash on the Dan River - Courtesy of Waterkeeper Alliance

Coal ash on the Dan River - click here to take action

How Many Spills Will it Take Before We Put Drinking Water First?

Kingston in 2008. Lake Michigan in 2011. North Carolina in 2014. None of these toxic coal ash spills should have happened, but because of decades of lax regulations, they did.  Take action today and tell the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that you are fed up with coal-burning power plants poisoning our water with lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium and other nasty chemicals - click here!

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