District of Columbia

DC Water Proposes Innovative Pollution Solution

A new proposed “green infrastructure” initiative could save energy and beautify neighborhoods while reducing pollution coming from sewer pipes in the District of Columbia. DC Water, the regional water and sewer authority that provides drinking water to DC residents and manages wastewater for the Washington metropolitan region, hopes to modify a legal settlement aimed at fixing sewage pollution in Rock Creek and the Anacostia and Potomac Rivers.

DC Bids Polystyrene Foam Good-Bye!

Anacostia-duck

On July 14th Washington, DC became the first major city on the East Coast to ban polystyrene foam food containers! Clean Water Action has been campaigning around this issue for months and thanks its many supporters who wrote letters in support of the ban to City Council members.  These harmful petroleum-based containers are non-biodegradable and account for up to a fourth of the trash polluting the Anacostia River.  Banning polystyrene is huge victory for the District and is an essential step in cleaning up the city’s rivers, wetlands and streams.  

D.C. Bans Polystyrene Foam Food Containers

Washington, D.C - Yesterday, July 14th 2014, the D.C Council voted unanimously to pass the ban on polystyrene foam food containers, as a part of the D.C. Omnibus Act of 2013. The ban will cover carryout food containers at grocery stores, restaurants and take out locations. This includes items like clamshells, cups, plates, etc. and will take effect January, 2016. In 2017, all disposable food ware will have to be recyclable or compostable.

Published On: 
07/15/2014 - 16:33

DC Stormwater

stormwater.jpga national leader on stormwater?
Late in 2011 the District of Columbia and Environmental Protection Agency representatives proclaimed the release of a new stormwater management permit that could significantly reduce the pollution flowing from storm drains into the creeks and rivers of the nation’s capital. The new permit calls for retaining the first 1.2 inches of rainfall on properties in the District. When enforced, this new standard will reduce the poison runoff that flows from streets, parking lots and other paved surfaces. The permit provides incentives for solutions and environmental design standards that help capture rain water, such as trees, rain gardens and other landscape that soaks in water.

D.C. Strikes Deal for Benning Road Power Plant Cleanup

cleaning the anacostia

biglips.jpgThe Anacostia is one of the ten most polluted rivers in the nation. For too long we have accepted that a polluted Anacostia has to be a reality for the District. However, under pressure from the EPA, the District Department of the Environment (DDOE) is finally dealing with the six most toxic sites along the Anacostia, one of which is Pepco's Benning Road power plant. On February 2, 2011, DDOE announced that it had reached a "consent decree" with Pepco that it believes will address the legacy of pollution at Benning Road (to learn more click here). The proposal is promising, as there have been six documented releases of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the site over the years. PCBS are known cuase developmental problems and are carcinogenic in humans and wildlife, for example two-third of all brown bull-head catfish (pictured above) in the Anacostia have tumors. 

Protecting and Restoring the Chesapeake

In 1983, 1987 and 2000, Maryland Governors and their counterparts in Virginia, the District of Columbia and other jurisdictions in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed signed formal agreements that set timelines for cleaning up the Bay.  The most recent agreement called for deadlines that were to be met by 2010.  That deadline will not be met.

Chesapeake Currents - Spring-Summer 2014

chesapeake currents
Spring/Summer 2014

Council's Science-Based Vote a Water Protection Landmark

Montgomery County’s Ten Mile Creek has been called the “last best creek.” It feeds the Little Seneca Reservoir which supplies emergency drinking water for more than 4.3 million DC area residents. The creek is at the center of a pristine and sensitive natural resource area in the northern part of the county and has long been threatened by short-sighted development proposals.

The Save Ten Mile Creek Coalition together with Clean Water Action scored a major victory this April, when the Montgomery County Council voted unanimously for responsible limits on  new development in area. The Council’s April 1 action thwarted developers’ latest plans, which would have paved over more than 150 acres. Read more

Stand Up for Strong Rules on Carbon Pollution!

#ActOnClimateThe Environmental Protection Agency is taking public comments on whether to close the loopholes that allow corporations and big polluters to dump unlimited amounts of carbon pollution from power plants into our air. This same pollution is already having devastating effects on water from Chesapeake Bay to the Great Lakes to the Colorado River and is putting our agricultural and tourism industries at risk.

Click here to submit your comment today!

Comments on DC Water Green Infrastructure Program

Clean Water Action

April 24, 2014

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the Long Term Control Plan (LTCP) Modification for Green Infrastructure (Public Review Draft of January 2014). Clean Water Action (Clean Water) supports the concepts embodied in the Review Draft but urges DC Water to make improvements in the area of accountability to water quality goals and cost projections in particular.  Clean Water was a leader among the groups critical of the original Long Term Control Plan (LTCP) for its reliance on gray infrastructure, and was among those who considered it a limited victory that green infrastructure was eventually mentioned in the approved original plan. 

Canvass Director and Assistant Canvass Director Positions Now Available

Clean Water Action is the nation’s largest grassroots group focused on water, energy and environmental health.  Clean Water Action’s 1 million members participate in Clean Water Action’s programs for clean, water, prevention of health-threatening pollution, and creation of environmentally-safe jobs and businesses.  Clean Water Action’s nonpartisan campaigns empower people to make democracy work.

Syndicate content