California

Endorsing Clean Water Champions in California

vote button with stars and stripesOn Tuesday, June 3rd, California voters will go to the polls to select candidates for dozens of federal state and local offices.  Because of California’s new primary laws, the two top vote-getters in each race, regardless of party affiliation, will face off against one another in November.

The following clean water champions deserve your vote on Tuesday.

Government's Estimate of Available Oil Under California Was Off by 96%

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has reportedly cut the amount of shale oil gas expected to be retrieved from the Monterey reserves in California, saying that earlier estimates overshot by quite a bit — about 96 percent. There goes our energy independence plan.

The Los Angeles Times reports that the EIA has revised downwards the amount of estimated possible oil extraction from 13.7 billion barrels to 600 million barrels. Oil taken from the Monterey Shale deposits was expected to boost the local economy by $24.6 billion each year and inject 2.8 million new jobs into the California market.
Published Date: 
05/21/2014

California Currents | Spring 2014

california currents
Spring 2014 Edition
Is a Fracking Moratorium in California’s Future?

Intense and growing pressure from Clean Water Action and others all across California have boosted the prospects for winning a moratorium this year on hydraulic fracturing (fracking, increasingly used for oil drilling), a top legislative priority for the past three years. The bill supported by Clean Water Action, SB1132 (Mitchell/Leno) would force a time-out while the state studies the risks. Concerns include groundwater contamination, greenhouse gas pollution, high volume water use, health-threatening air pollution and the potential for increased earthquake risk.

Another bill, SB1281 (Pavley) would protect communities and their water resources from other oil and gas activities. It would require oil drillers to disclose water use and increase oversight of industry’s wastewater handling and disposal. Read More

Targeting Micro Plastic Debris

Our oceans are filling with plastic. And the problem is getting worse each year. In 1997, California researchers found six times more plastic than plankton on the surface of the North Pacific Gyre. Ten years later, when they repeated the study, the ratio of plastic to plankton was five times greater. Luckily there is something we can do about it - take action here.

Learn more about what we're doing about zeroa waste and plastic pollution.

Clean Water Advocates Call Proposed Recycled Water Rules 'Permissive'

When California Governor Jerry Brown first declared a drought emergency at the beginning of the year, the California State Water Resources Control Board started drafting a new process so more household wastewater can be recycled for irrigation.

Scott Couch is with the water quality division at the State Water Board.

“It is a valuable resource,” Couch says.

He says the new permit is a blueprint regional water managers can use to speed up approvals for reclaimed water – what is now an involved process.

“We encourage recycled water used for beneficial use and it aids in conservation of potable water supplies.”
Published Date: 
04/29/2014

Stanislaus cities among those exceeding new state standard for hexavalent chromium in water

A long debate over how much hexavalent chromium is too much in drinking water resurfaced last week as state health leaders produced the nation’s first drinking water standard.

Although the carcinogen has shown up in water wells throughout Stanislaus, Merced and San Joaquin counties in higher concentrations than most other places throughout the United States, the new standard suggests Modesto has little to worry about. Some wells in Patterson, Newman and Los Banos, however, have produced samples that would not meet maximum contaminant levels.
Published Date: 
04/20/2014

California Fails to Protect Drinking Water from Toxic “Erin Brockovich” Chemical

State’s New Standard 500 Times Higher Than Cal EPA’s Safe Level

SAN FRANCISCO (April 15, 2014) – The California Department of Public Health today announced its final drinking water standard for the toxic chemical hexavalent chromium made infamous in the film Erin Brockovich. The state’s new Maximum Contaminant Level of 10 parts per billion is 500 times greater than the level identified as safe by the California Environmental Protection Agency.

Published On: 
04/15/2014 - 06:47

Canvass Director and Assistant Canvass Director Positions Now Available

Clean Water Action is the nation’s largest grassroots group focused on water, energy and environmental health.  Clean Water Action’s 1 million members participate in Clean Water Action’s programs for clean, water, prevention of health-threatening pollution, and creation of environmentally-safe jobs and businesses.  Clean Water Action’s nonpartisan campaigns empower people to make democracy work.

Keeping drugs out of California’s waterways

We Can Keep Drugs Out of CA's Waterways

Environmental and public health risks of unused medications

We are fortunate to live at a time when medical advances, including the development of antibiotics and other types of drugs, have enhanced and lengthened human life. Unused  medications, however, pose some risks to human health and the environment that are not widely recognized. When they get into the wrong hands, unused medications can lead to drug abuse and accidental poisonings. Pharmaceuticals are also ending up in our waterways, including drinking water sources.

Fracking Boom Would Increase California’s Earthquake Danger

On Shaky Ground - Get the ReportSAN FRANCISCO— Oil companies are increasing California’s earthquake risk by injecting billions of gallons of oil and gas wastewater a year into hundreds of disposal wells near active faults around Los Angeles, Bakersfield and other major cities, according to a new report from Earthworks, the Center for Biological Diversity and Clean Water Action.

A boom in hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) in California would worsen the danger of earthquakes, the report finds, by greatly increasing oil wastewater production and underground injection. Extracting the Monterey Shale’s oil could produce almost 9 trillion gallons of contaminated wastewater, the report estimates. That could expose California to a surge in damaging earthquakes like those seen in Oklahoma, Texas, and other states experiencing rapidly increased fracking and wastewater production.

Published On: 
03/13/2014 - 09:00
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