democracy

Tell the Board of Pharmacy: Don't Obstruct Take-Back Programs!

pills_smallClean Water Action’s drug pollution prevention program has received tremendous support from our members and we are working to expand the number of communities that establish policies to ensure industry supported proper disposal programs. 

We need your help now, more than ever, as our progress is being threatened by the attempts of an unelected body of individuals to obstruct programs established by locally elected officials working on behalf of their constituents.  

Tell the Board of Pharmacy today to endorse the DEA’s safety rules for drug disposal programs and get out of the way of protecting our water and our communities.

Semonole County Bans Fracking

Seminole County, north of Orlando, sent a strong message to the state legislature when the Seminole County Commission approved a ban on fracking within county limits last night. 

They also reaffirmed  their opposition to the legislation moving in the state legislature that would  restrict local decisions about it. While other local governments and counties have passed strong resolutions in opposition to fracking, Seminole took it a step further by passing a ban.

Save the Date! Clean Water Action's 30th Annual Conference Saturday, April 9th

20150425_101344.jpg For the past 29 years, Clean Water Action has held an environmental conference in New Jersey, inspiring education, organizing and activism.

2016 Rhode Island Legislative Priorities

The 2016 Rhode Island General Assembly is underway. Clean Water is supporting several bills to protect our health and communities from toxic chemicals in flame retardants, disclose the ingredients in cosmetics, move Rhode Island forward on clean energy, and help combat climate change.

Thoughts on Flint: Putting Drinking Water First - Back to Basics

By Lynn Thorp, Campaigns Director - On Twitter (@LTCWA)

Our approach to drinking water protection - “Putting Drinking Water First” - feels light years away from the crisis in Flint, with seemingly nothing to offer based on what we have learned about the causes of this situation. Over 100,000 people are unable to use their tap water. Flint already had high levels of lead-poisoned children. Now those numbers have doubled. A Legionnaire’s disease outbreak may well be related. All because officials put the bottom-line first.

"Putting Drinking Water First”, exactly what officials didn't do in Flint, is animated by our belief that we can make smarter choices that will benefit us while keeping contamination out of our drinking water. It's focused on the need for 21st century thinking about how we handle pollution issues in a more integrated fashion. Ultimately, it’s optimistic thinking about making smart choices.

Unfortunately, we don't always do that.

Protecting Clean Water - The President Gets It

Washington - Last night the President vetoed S.J. Res 22, a “Resolution of Disapproval” under the Congressional Review Act to repeal the Clean Water Rule, the Administration’s landmark initiative to restore critical Clean Water Act protections to our nation’s streams, wetlands and other water bodies.

Clean Water Action President and CEO Bob Wendelgass released this statement:

Published On: 
01/20/2016 - 06:34

New Jersey Currents - Fall 2015

New Jersey Currents
fall 2015 edition

NJ Legislature Still Flunking on the Environment

By David Pringle, Campaign Director
Clean Water Action’s 2014-15 NJ Legislative Scorecard found a majority of state legislators failed on the environment, much as they did 2 years ago.

There were fourteen notable exceptions. These legislators, whom Clean Water Action called ‘heroes’, joined the call for immediate corrective action by the legislature. Click here to see what the heroes are saying.

Overall the Legislature took pro-environment positions less than half (47%) of the time. On every legislative initiative the anti-environment position succeeded or the pro-environment position was watered down because:

Pennsylvania Currents - Fall 2015

Pennsylvania Currents
fall 2015 edition

Environmental Rights at Stake in Pennsylvania Supreme Court Election November 3

The outcome of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court election may be the most important of the election season. The Supreme Court has made decisions in many cases critical to health, communities and the environment in the past decade. It will likely play a role in redistricting after the 2020 census and may hear cases related to local governments’ attempts to restrict fracking. The judges on the court matter.

In 2013 Pennsylvania passed Act 13, which stripped local municipalities of the ability to use zoning to protect communities from the dangers associated with natural gas drilling. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court struck down this provision. The Court ruled Act 13 was unconstitutional because it violated the Pennsylvania Constitution’s Environmental Rights Amendment which states “the people have a right to clean air, pure water, and to the preservation of the natural, scenic, historic and esthetic values of the environment. Pennsylvania’s public natural resources are the common property of all the people, including generations yet to come.” The three vacancies on the court are judges who ruled with the majority in this landmark case.

Clean Water Action has endorsed the following candidates for Pennsylvania Supreme Court because they have demonstrated a commitment in their personal and judicial philosophy to protecting public health and our environmental rights: David Wecht, Kevin Dougherty, and Christine Donahue.

Texas Currents Fall 2015

Texas Currents
fall 2015 edition

North Texas Water Plan Heavy on Reservoirs, Light on Conservation

State law divides Texas into 16 water planning regions. Each region must present an updated plan for meeting future needs every five years. Region C covers the 16-county Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex and includes some of the nation’s fastest growing suburbs. Region C’s proposed update was recently open for public comment.

In August, Clean Water Fund submitted comments on the Water Plan which faulted it for prioritizing expensive new reservoirs over conservation.

Dallas and Fort Worth have made progress in lowering per capita gallons of consumption (GPCD) through toilet rebate programs and the “Lawn Whisperer” campaign, which offers tips on more efficient lawn watering. However, the GPCD for most cities in Region C remains well above the state average, and few cities have programs in place to lower consumption. Fewer than half of Region C communities limit lawn watering, even during drought. Less than 40% have tiered rate structures to promote conservation and only 25% punish water waste. Read more

Fighting Flame Retardants

The Consumer Product Safety Commission  in Washington, D.C. is taking public comments on a petition to ban the use of an entire class of toxic chemicals contained in consumer items like electronics, furniture and children’s products.

These chemicals, called organohalogens, have been linked to serious health problems including cancers, nervous system disorders, reproductive ailments and lowered IQ. The chemicals off-gas from products, bond with dust and accumulate in our bodies.

They are particularly hazardous to children, pregnant women and firefighters, who are face heightened exposure when combating blazes.
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