Strengthening Clean Water Protections

Clean Water is working to ensure that small streams and wetlands are protected under the Clean Water Act’s pollution control programs.  The Clean Water Rule restores safeguards to most streams and wetlands and protects the drinking water sources for more than 117 million people.

Putting Drinking Water First #2

Putting Drinking Water First: The Clean Water Rule

Clean Water’s Putting Drinking Water First approach means making drinking water impacts a primary consideration when developing regulations and other programs involving upstream activities that can impact downstream drinking water sources.
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Senator Markey (D-MA) and the Wheel of Giveaways. Screenshot from CSPAN

Stop the Dirty Water Agenda

Big polluters and their friends in Congress are pushing an extreme agenda to rollback vital laws, regulations, and funding that protect clean water, reduce air pollution, and fight climate change.

Clean Water Currents - Fall 2016

Clean Water Currents - Fall 2016

EPA Bans Discharge of Fracking Wastewater from Sewage Plants

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Lake Erie Algal Bloom - August 2015. Photo Credit: NOAA Great Lakes CoastWatch

Harmful Algal Blooms and Drinking Water

In summer 2014 the residents in and around Toledo, Ohio were told not to drink, cook, or bathe with the water from their faucets.

From We All Live Downstream

Ripples on the surface of the water. Credit: 2xWilfinger / Shutterstock
March 2, 2017

In his Joint Address to Congress on Tuesday, President Trump touted he will “promote clean air and clean water.” His remarks came only hours after signing an Executive Order directing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) to “reconsider” their 2015 Clean Water Rule that strengthened clean water protections.

Send a message to the Senate about Scott Pruitt
February 17, 2017

Republicans in the Senate had an opportunity to protect clean water and safeguard public health by rejecting Scott Pruitt as EPA administrator. They didn't take it.

Stream, image from the surface of the water. Photo credit: Olesya Mishkina / Shutterstock
February 3, 2017

On Tuesday, January 31st, we had our first bill hearing for SB 266 - reinstating the requirement for Best Available Technology for all new septic systems in Maryland. This fall, Governor Hogan overturned the previous regulation that required that new septic systems treat their nitrogen pollution. Old systems do nothing to prevent the nitrogen from our waste from reaching our water. The new technology reduces nitrogen by 60%.