The Clean Water Blog

We All Live Downstream

Two women voting. Photo credit: Burlingham / Shutterstock
August 26, 2016

This is why elections matter. Clean Water Action engages a voters throughout Northern Virginia to turn out and vote. And then hold their elected official accountable.

shutterstock, Lori Martin
August 26, 2016

The Sunset Review of the Texas Railroad Commission is well underway, and on Monday, August 15 I joined dozens of other Texans to speak out at the Sunset Advisory Commission's public hearing at the State Capitol.

Oil Train photo by Jennifer Kunze
August 25, 2016

In Baltimore, Clean Water Action has been working for two years to prevent further oil train traffic from passing through our city and to make sure the City government, emergency services, and the public know all of the risks and health impacts that oil train shipments can cause. Our campaign is only a part of a nation-wide effort to stop oil trains, and the past few weeks have seen a lot of important victories and news across the country.

Gas flare near trees. Photo credit: Lakeview Images / Shutterstock
August 23, 2016

Enjoy this guest blog from our friends and allies at Conservation Colorado. If you haven't yet contacted the EPA about reducing methane pollution - act today!

Storm the State House for Safe Chemicals
August 23, 2016

In this work sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, and sometimes the thing you’ve been pouring your heart and soul into just peters out at the end of a legislative session and you set your sights on next year. 

Katie McGinty / photo via katiemcginty.com
August 22, 2016

Clean Water Action is proud to endorse Katie McGinty for U.S. Senate.

Maryland Gas Basins. Source USGS
August 17, 2016

When Marylanders consider the risk of fracking in our state, we usually think of the Western Maryland counties – Washington, Alleghany, and Garret – that lie above the Marcellus Gas Basin.  But smaller gas basins cross all parts of our state, including two in Frederick County.  The Culpeper Basin stretches north from Virginia beneath Adamstown and Ballenger Creek to southern Frederick City; the Gettysburg Basin comes south from Pennsylvania beneath the Monocacy River touching Emmitsburg, Thurmont, and the northern edge of Frederick City including parts of Fort Detrick.  All together, 19% of Frederick County has frackable gas beneath it – and that puts our farms, rivers, and drinking water at risk.

Frederick County_Stormwater_Maryland_Photo by Jennifer Kunze
August 17, 2016

“Generally, they’re getting worse.” That was the verdict on Frederick County’s local streams at last night’s public hearing on the County’s Financial Assurance Plan, a document that should outline how the County government will pay for stormwater restoration projects mandated by the Chesapeake Bay Plan.

Fredrick County Maryland photo for Brent Bolin blog post
August 16, 2016

Local policy push aims to clean up Monocacy and Potomac rivers.

SGACC Celebration in Maryland
August 12, 2016

Last month, Charles County Commissioners voted 3/2 in favor of a new Comprehensive Growth Plan that will preserve Charles County’s precious natural resources and high quality of life for generations to come.